‘A medical necessity:’ With dentistry services limited during pandemic, at-home preventive care is key

MILWAUKEE — While dentists may be closed for preventive care, don’t put your toothbrushes down. Doctors say keeping your oral health is more important than ever for adults and children alike.

The spread of the coronavirus put an abrupt stop to our normal routine. Preventive visits to dentist offices were delayed, but unfortunately, that’s also when a lot of problems are detected.

Dr. Kevin Donly

“We’ve only been able to provide emergency care,” Dr. Kevin Donly, president of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, said. “Oral health is actually a medical necessity.”

Because oral health is critical to overall health, Donly maintaining your child’s oral care routine is essential to preventing dental emergencies during the pandemic. Those emergencies are categorized in three ways.

“Trauma, where a kid bumps their tooth, falls down and cracks their tooth,” Donly said. “Second, infection. We’ve seen kids with facial cellulitis, this can be detrimental to their overall health, we really need to see those kids right away.

“The other one is pain. Sometimes they have really deep cavities that cause a lot of pain and they need to see the pediatric dentist right away and get care.”

Donly says with some offices reopening soon, new protocols will be taken to ensure everyone’s safety.

“First of all you, will be contacted a day before your appointment for a prescreening call,” said Donly. “They will ask about a child’s health, are they feeling well? Are they running a fever?”

There will be spaces in waiting rooms due to social distancing, and dental assistants, hygienists and dentists will all be wearing gowns, masks and face shields, Donly said.

Prevention is key with regular cleanings delayed. When it comes to prevention, Donly recommends brushing with a fluoridated toothpaste a couple of times a day, try to keep sugary drinks and snacks away, and check your kids’ teeth on a daily basis.

This content was originally published here.

Embracing the future of dentistry: Rendezvous Dental now offering Tele-dentistry

The future of medicine as we know it is evolving, whether we like it or not. You may have even heard the term “telemedicine” in recent talks about healthcare.

With the introduction of internet and technology, a world of possibilities could open up; from access to top medical professionals all over the world, to medical assessments conducted from the comfort of your home.

The ability to diagnose (and in some cases, treat) remotely are made possible. For obvious reasons, this new technology could have some positive implications for rural communities like ours.

As healthcare as we know it evolves, the same rings true for oral health. The dental field is adopting Tele-dentistry which involves “the exchange of clinical information and images over remote distances for dental consultation and treatment planning.” .

What does this mean for patients?
For you, the patient, this could mean access to better oral healthcare, online consultations, and in some cases lower costs. For example, you can now get a professional opinion from your dentist without taking time off work or pulling your kid out of school.

Here locally, Rendezvous Dental is embracing the future of dentistry.
Forward-thinking dentists, like Dr. Colton Crane at Rendezvous Dental are already using this cutting-edge technology to improve the patient experience.

Let’s try it!
Tele-dentistry with Rendezvous Dental is easy. Visit their website and follow the instructions. Fill out the online form, describe your concern in detail, and attach two images from different angles. For just $25, you can have a response from Dr. Crane within 2-3 hours (during business hours)!

In most cases this is enough for Crane to decide if your problem is cause for immediate concern or something that can wait until your next cleaning. In a pinch, antibiotics could be prescribed too. Should an x-ray or further exam be in order, Rendezvous Dental will apply your $25 as a credit.

This new service is currently available online at rendezvousdental.com/tele-dentistry. For more information, call Rendezvous Dental at  or stop by their office at 312 N 8th St. W. in Riverton.

This content was originally published here.

Using AI to improve dentistry, VideaHealth gets a $5.4 million polish

Florian Hillen, the chief executive officer of a new startup called VideaHealth, first started researching the problems with dentistry about three years ago.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard educated researcher had been doing research in machine learning and image recognition for years and wanted to apply that research in a field that desperately needed the technology.

Dentistry, while an unlikely initial target, proved to be a market that the young entrepreneur could really sink his teeth into.

“Everyone goes to the dentist [and] in the dentist’s office, x-rays are the major diagnostic tool,” Hillen says. “But there is a lack of standard quality in dentistry. If you go to three different dentists you might get three different opinions.”

With VideaHealth (and competitors like Pearl) the machine learning technologies the company has developed can introduce a standard of care across dental practices, say Hillen. That’s especially attractive as dental businesses become rolled up into large service provider plays in much of the U.S.

Screen Shot 2019 09 16 at 16.33.16 1

Image courtesy of VideaHealth

Dental practitioners also present a more receptive audience to the benefits of automation than some other medical health professionals (ahem… radiologists). Because dentists have more than one role in the clinic they can see enabling technologies like image recognition as something that will help their practices operate more efficiently rather than potentially put people out of a job.

“AI in radiology competes with the radiologist,” says Hillen. “In dentistry we support the dentist to detect diseases more reliably, more accurately, and earlier.”

The ability to see more patients and catch problems earlier without the need for more time consuming and invasive procedures for a dentist actually presents a better outcome for both practitioners and patients, Hillen says.

It’s been a year since Hillen launched the company and he’s already attracted investors including Zetta Venture Partners, Pillar and MIT’s Delta V, who invested in the company’s most recent $5.4 million seed financing.

Already the company has collaborations with dental clinics across the U.S. through partnerships with organizations like Heartland Dental, which operates over 950 clinics in the Midwest. The company has seven employees currently and will use its cash to hire broadly and for further research and development.

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Photo courtesy of VideaHealth

This content was originally published here.

How USC students deal with physical stress caused by dentistry

Minalie Jain had experienced pain before, but when she started to work in the simulation lab at USC, the shooting pain in her arm caught her attention.

The sim lab involves a lot of fine handwork, with students bent over molds of teeth. The intensity of the muscle contractions left Jain in stabbing and throbbing pain.

Fortunately for her, the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC and the university’s physical therapy program have teamed up to use physical therapy skills that can help dental students deal with the physical stress caused by dentistry. Jain now does physical therapy to help her in day-to-day work.

Physical stress: Ergonomics and body mechanics offer relief

Dental students had always had one lecture on ergonomics from a physical therapy professor, but when Kenneth Kim, instructor of clinical physical therapy, took over that lecture, he thought the schools could do more together.

“I felt like a lecture once a year wasn’t enough — especially because we were seeing so many dental students at the clinic,” he said. “Sometimes the students were getting pretty emotional because of all the pain.”

Kim worked with Jin-Ho Phark, associate professor of clinical dentistry, to set up the ergonomics and body mechanics collaboration after the lecture. This is the first year that physical therapy students go to the dental students’ sim lab once a week, for two hours in the morning and two hours in the afternoon. “We can follow up on body position and patient position, and they have been really receptive,” Kim said.

The biggest issues that dental students face are forces on their hands, necks and arms as they work on models of patients.

They sometimes forget to adjust the patient to make their own bodies work more easily.

Kenneth Kim

“They sometimes forget to adjust the patient to make their own bodies work more easily,” Kim said. “That means that students can stay hunched over, in that position for hours, which causes neck and back pain. We come in and make a small adjustment, which results in a huge outcome.”

Musculoskeletal disorders: a widespread problem

Dentists are particularly prone to musculoskeletal disorders: 70 percent of dentists suffer from them, compared to 12 percent of surgeons. That’s mainly because dentistry requires lots of repetitive motions, especially by the hand and wrist, as well as sustained postures, said Phark says, who explained that students in the sim lab work on mannequins, learning to use drills inside tooth models. The way they position their necks forward or slouch their backs can often result in lower back and shoulder pain.

“We see that throughout the years students in dental school don’t always take care of their posture while they perform procedures,” he said. That’s hard on a body, especially considering students are working in the same position for eight hours a day.

In addition to the lectures and hands-on help, students can often position themselves better by using their loupes, which allows them to maintain a certain distance from a patient.

“With lenses on the loupes, you can’t really adjust them so there is a working length in which they have to position themselves,” Phark said.

Sit for some patients and stand for others

Kenneth Gozali uses his loupes to remind himself to keep a good posture and position with patients. He focuses on sitting straight, having the right chair height and patient height — all of which make it easier to do his work.

“It was a little strange because I was not all that used to sitting all day, but now I like to switch it up: I’ll sit down for two or three patients and then stand up for the next ones,” he says, adding that in dentistry it’s all about keeping your hands and arms in good working order. “You can’t do much with a bad back or bad arm.”

Phark has used the collaboration as a refresher in his own work: He noticed there were days when he came home in pain.

“My back is hurting, my neck is hurting, I have to maintain a proper posture myself,” he said. “It’s not just preaching — we have to practice ourselves.”

Phark works on Wednesdays in the USC Dental Faculty Practice for 12 hours. “I basically cannot survive the day if I’m not sitting properly,” he said.

Two-way education

The dental students have been very receptive to the instruction and advice, since many of them experience a variety of issues that we can help them navigate and problem solve, whether it is pain, fatigue or difficulty visualizing target areas within the mouth, said Ashley Wallace, who has also learned things from the dental students

“I’ve learned the dentistry-specific language in regards to quadrants and tooth surfaces, and how the position of both the patient and dentist change depending on the target surface, procedure and tools required or whether direct or indirect vision is used.”

Wallace said it’s been valuable to adapt her training to a specific audience such as the dental students.

“My hope is that if they implement proper body mechanics now, they will have less need for physical therapy down the road.”

It takes three weeks to break a habit

Kim hopes to continue and expand the collaboration in the coming years. This year, physical therapy students are only working in the dental school for five weeks — and they are trying to figure out how to do more in the future.

“For the first year, five weeks is pretty good,” Kim said. “It takes three weeks to break a bad habit, like slouching or stooping. With our presence, we can get them to be more mindful about their posture going forward.”

Jain will continue to do physical therapy exercises, which she said are helping her pain. An X-ray showed calcified tendonitis in her rotator cuff, a genetic condition that was exacerbated by her dental school work. She’s grateful for the extra perspective and help she gained from the collaboration.

“Ergonomics is very crucial in dental school because forming a bad habit is really easy since it is very difficult seeing in the mouth,” she said. “It is important to keep the back straight and the arms in appropriate positioning so it doesn’t cause strain on it, even for people who do not have arm issues.”

This content was originally published here.

Riccobene Associates Family Dentistry Donates to Local Food Banks

Riccobene Associates Family Dentistry is working hard to do all they can to help those in need during the COVID-19 outbreak. Since the company’s founding over 19 years ago, the dental group has always given back to the communities they serve. This week and in weeks to come, the Riccobene staff will be teaming up with local food banks to help carry out their mission in providing food and support for those in need. Each of the 30+ Riccobene locations across North Carolina will be participating in this community initiative, donating non-perishable food items, including canned fruits and vegetables, cereal, peanut butter, juice boxes and other needed food items. 

The Riccobene team encourages allwho are able, to support their local food banks. With many schools and businesses shutting down to prevent the spread of COVID-19, thousands will be left without food. Smiles on Us, a community outreach program Riccobene Associates started to give back to local communities, is determined to take advantage of this opportunity to make a big impact. 

“We’re proud to participate in the community’s efforts to help children and families across North Carolina who are in need. It’s the right thing to do, and it’s who we are as a company,” says Whitney Suiter, Director of Marketing at Riccobene Associates.

To encourage donations, Riccobene Associates has provided a list of food banks across North Carolina. 

List of Local Food Banks

Raleigh

1924 Capital Boulevard, Raleigh, NC 27604

Wake Forest

149 E Holding Avenue, Wake Forest, NC 27587

Knightdale

111 N First Ave, Knightdale, NC 27545

Cary

187 High House Road, Cary, NC 27511

Apex

1600 Olive Chapel Road, Suite 408, Apex, NC 27502

Garner

209 S Robertson Street, Clayton, NC 27520

Clayton

Samaritan Shelf Food PantryWest Clayton Church of God // 143 Short Johnson Rd, Clayton, NC 27520

Selma

401 W Anderson St, Selma, NC 27576

Goldsboro

Community Soup Kitchen112 West Oak St. Goldsboro 27530 (no website) 919-731-3939

Greensboro

3210 Summit Avenue, Greensboro, Nc, 27405

Charlotte

500-B Spratt Street, Charlotte, NC 28206

Fayetteville

Hunger Can’t Wait406 Deep Creek Road, Fayetteville, NC 28312

Clemmons

2585 Old Glory Road, Suite 109, Clemmons, NC 27012

Benson

Deliverance Church- 103 E Main St, Benson, NC 27504

Rocky Mount

1725 Davis Street, Rocky Mount, NC 27803

Holly Ridge

12395 NC Hwy 50, Hampstead, NC 28443

Oxford

ACIM (Area Congregations In Ministry) – 634 Roxboro Rd, Oxford, NC 27565

Wilmington

1314 Marstellar Street, Wilmington, NC 28401

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Nicole ‘The Lip Doctor’ Bell redefining cosmetic dentistry

Long Island native Dr. Nicole Bell, also known as “The Lip Doctor,” has risen to success as a result of fusing dentistry and advanced esthetics.

After graduating from Baldwin Senior High School, Bell attended Manhattan College in Riverdale, New York, on a full academic scholarship. Her dental career began with studies at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, where she earned a doctor of dental surgery degree in 2001.

Currently, Bell shares two locations — in Long Island’s Freeport village and in downtown Brooklyn — where she is certified to treat with lasers and performs most procedures without the use of a drill or anesthetic. 

Rolling out had the opportunity to speak with Bell about her passion for cosmetic dentistry, what differentiates her practices, and her advice for entrepreneurs in the medical field.

When did you realize that you wanted to be a doctor?

When I was 5 years old I won a science fair, and after the competition, I was asked what I wanted to be when I grow up. I said, “I want to be a doctor.” Having my parents segue and guide me along the way made me feel like there was nothing to prevent me from becoming a doctor. The word doctor just stuck with me, and I continued to move forward. Medicine was intriguing but, more specifically, dentistry became appealing to me in college. I was heavily influenced by the dean of my dental school who is now the president of the dental school at Meharry Medical College.

Click continue to read more.

God, Fam, Biz, and Good Vibes. Writing about the things and people who matter that are making an impact in our community. Content Producer / Editor, entrepreneur and former Fortune 500 Sales and Marketing Executive.

This content was originally published here.

International Women’s Day: A Celebration of Women in Dentistry

Times have certainly changed since 1898, when Emma Gaudreau Casgrain became the first woman licensed to be a dentist in Canada. Today women are a growing force in the dental industry within Canada and beyond. According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, the number of women dentists in Canada rose from 16 percent in 1991 to 28 percent in 2001. By 2011, the proportion had grown to 29.5.

International Women’s Day is the ideal time to take a closer look at the role of women in the field of dentistry.

More Women Are Graduating With Dentistry Degrees

The number of women practicing dentistry in Canada should continue growing with women graduating with dentistry degrees than men. For example, in 2016, 34 women graduated from the University of British Columbia’s (UBC) dentistry schools for every 24 males. Many dentists estimate roughly half of their graduating class members were women.

Dr. Alison Fransen, a general dentist at Wesbrook Village Dental Centre who graduated from UBC in 1997, said she had a “great experience in dental school,” which gave her “lots to learn.”

Dr. Wise Tang, a general dentist at Burnaby’s Mega Dental Group, added her experience of going through dentistry school and finding employment was “Challenging, but very rewarding.”

Dr. Julia McKay and Dr. Carlos Quiñonez, in their article “The Feminization of Dentistry: Implications for the Profession” published in the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association, stated female dental students bring something different to the classroom than their male peers. Female students are more emotionally sensitive and expressive, qualities which help them socialize with other students and respond to the patients they see during internships and hands-on course components.

Women in Dentistry Have Prominent Female Figures to Inspire Them

More Women Are Graduating With Dentistry DegreesIn her 2006 Psychology of Women Quarterly article “Someone like me can be successful: Do college students need same-gender role models?,” Penelope Lockwood explained female students are significantly more influenced by a role model’s gender than male students.

Female students, she wrote, feel much more motivated when reading about a successful woman in their field than a successful man. When citing career role models, female students also tended to identify women they look up to, largely because they felt they may face similar industry challenges to the women that inspired them. It’s significant that as more women excel in dentistry, more women are inspired to follow in their footsteps.

Burnaby dentist Dr. Wise Tang says Dr. Karen Burgess, who she observed practice during her volunteer program, is one of her greatest inspirations. Dr. Burgess is a trailblazing oral pathologist who works closely with Dr. Jonathan Irish diagnosing and treating mouth cancers at Princess Margaret’s Dental Oncology, Ocular, and Maxillofacial Prosthetics Clinic. This clinic is the busiest of its kind in Canada, seeing 14,000 patients every year.

Vancouver dentist Dr. Alison Fransen still considers Dr. Marcia Boyd, the dean while Dr. Fransen studied at UBC Dentistry, one of her greatest career role models. An Order of Canada recipient, Dr. Boyd was the first Canadian woman to serve as the president of the American College of Dentists. She also led a task force on the future of organized dentistry in British Columbia for the province’s College of Dental Surgeons and was an organizer and speaker for the American Dental Education Association’s International Women’s Leadership Conference.

Female Dentists Are Providing a Different Experience for Patients

Female Dentists Tend to Work DifferentlyFor centuries, a trip to the dentist has been perceived as something to fear. However, as more women enter the field, that perception is slowly changing, according to McKay and Quiñonez. While most female dentists don’t think their professional experiences are any different from those of their male counterparts, studies show female dentists bring different traits and practices to their clinics.

Female dentists are said to be more empathetic and better able to communicate with their patients. They seem to be less rushed and willing to discuss their patients’ ailments and concerns in a more caring, humane way than male dentists. Just 8 percent of female dentists expect their patients to experience pain in the chair compared to 46 percent of male dentists. This suggests female dentists will often take greater care to reduce the pain their patients experience than male dentists.

Female Dentists Tend to Work Differently

Once dental practices were male-dominated spaces, but today female representation is at an all time high. In fact, one-third of the dentists at 123 Dentists are women. Female dentists can also bring a different kind of decision-making to any practice, according to self-reported research cited by McKay and Quiñonez. Men replied in a survey that they usually base their decisions on objectivity, logic, and consistency, while the women reported being more motivated by how they feel. Their personal values, sympathies, and desire to maintain harmony and tact are important factors in patient care.

Female Dentists Tend to Work DifferentlyThe personal qualities women typically possess see them spearheading unique dental programs like Ontario’s Project Restoring Smiles. The women behind this initiative provide free dental procedures to survivors of domestic violence who are self-conscious about what their abuse has done to their smiles. These dentists provides extensive procedures costing thousands, including orthodontics, bleaching, crowns and bridges, root canals, extractions, dental implants, and surgical facial reconstruction free of charge.

“Our vision is to restore confidence in women who have survived domestic violence by addressing the physical effects of abuse,” Dr. Tina Meisami explained in a statement cited by women’s blog SheKnows. “Restoring a woman’s smile has an incredibly powerful impact on her overall physical and mental health.”

Since launching in 2011, Project Restoring Smiles has treated more than 45 patients to more than $200,000 worth of complimentary dental services.

The different character traits female dentists exhibit, as seen in the team from Project Restoring Smiles, translate into the different approaches McKay and Quiñonez saw female and male dentists taking in clinical practice. They noted male dentists tend to use gloves, masks, and protective eyewear less frequently than female dentists, who reported being more concerned with infection control. Women also typically favour preventative measures, while male dentists are more likely to advocate significant restoration. The willingness that these women have to head off problems before they arise could have a significant impact on their patients and the entire dental industry, in fact.

Female dentists are also more likely to refer the patients to specialists rather than attempting to resolve patient problems themselves. McKay and Quiñonez stated 70.3 percent of female dentists have referred simple and complex surgical cases to specialists compared to just 49.5 percent of male dentists.

Female Dentists Come From Diverse Backgrounds

Female Dentists Come From Diverse BackgroundsVarious scientific studies acknowledge that diversity in any industry makes professionals more creative, more diligent, and more hard-working.

For that reason, the large number of female dental professionals that come from nations outside of North America is also notable.

Burnaby dentist Dr. Wise Tang hails from Hong Kong and offers her services in English, Mandarin, and Cantonese, and is the owner of two 123Dentist offices.

Dr. Roshanak Rahmanian received her Doctor of Dental Surgery in Iran before completing a two-year qualifying program at the University of Toronto to practice in Canada.

Today she works as a general dentist at the Lonsdale Dental Centre in North Vancouver.

Representation of Women in Dentistry Goes Beyond Dentists

Representation of Women in Dentistry Goes Beyond DentistsWhen assessing the impact of women in dentistry, it makes sense to analyze the number of practicing dentists. However, this doesn’t tell the entire story. Approximately 98 percent of Canada’s dental hygienists are women, along with 95 percent of its dental assistants. Both these roles feature in the top five female-dominated professions in Canada.

Women are also taking a growing role in leading dental practices. For example, 28 percent of 123Dentist clinic owners are women. Anecdotal evidence also suggests more women are specializing in dentistry.

While general dentistry remains popular, many female dentists say they see more of their peers pursuing roles in specialties like oral surgery and endodontics. Women like these continue to make strides in dental specialties and assert themselves in exciting new dental fields.

Dentistry Is Growing to Reflect What Women Want

Women in dentistry typically demand different things than their male colleagues. They often want time off to raise children and usually retire earlier. In his article “The 5 Most Dangerous Trends Facing Dentists and Their Families Today,” Evan Carmichael noted that male dentists typically work for 35 years, while female dentists usually work for 20 years in the profession. This statistic is bound to change since the ratio of women to men in the industry is continually changing, and will be interesting to observe over the coming decades.

Dentistry Is Growing to Reflect What Female Dentists WantAs more women take roles in dentistry, we are seeing dental practices create more flexible working environments that reflect the needs of women. The current crop of dentists encourages those of the future to continue striving for the working conditions and work-life balance they need to achieve success.

We surveyed a number of female dentists and below are some of their comments and advice for women considering becoming dentists.

“My advice for future women dentists would be to know yourself and how to manage the stress of being a perfectionist, which can be in the nature of those personalities that go into dentistry,” one respondent said. “It can be overwhelming to own a practice, and be a ‘perfect’ clinical dentist, ‘perfect’ employer, ‘perfect’ colleague, lifelong learner and ‘perfect’ mother and still juggle everything with the impossible standards we set for ourselves. We wear many hats.”

“Having a dental career while being a mom is tough,” another respondent said. “One should strive to balance her career and family life, but the drive is the influence one can give to each and every patient and it’s priceless.”

While juggling the demands of dentistry with home life can be challenging, our dentists are showing they can do it all with ease, all while bringing new elements and approaches to an established industry. Although this was once a male-dominated field, women and their successes have now become integral to dentistry in Canada and beyond.

So with all of that said, we’d like to wish you all a happy International Women’s Day!

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This content was originally published here.

‘So shocking:’ MU Dentistry student makes history as 1st African-American class president

MILWAUKEE — Dental tools in hand and teeth to work on is Chante Parker’s comfort zone. But being the first African-American class president for Marquette University’s School of Dentistry is still sinking in.

Chante Parker

“I’m the one that’s imprinting on history and it’s like, I never thought that,” said Parker.

Park has been class president since July of 2019 and serves as an ambassador for her class to create new initiatives for the dental school. She had no idea she’d be the first African-American to step into those shoes in the school’s 125 years of existence.

“I realize the magnitude of this opportunity, but it’s just so shocking to believe that it’s me,” Parker said.

Parker grew up in Atlanta and completed her undergraduate degree at The University of Miami, so she said moving to Milwaukee was a culture shock.

“It’s very segregated in where people live and where people thrive, and how the city runs itself,” said Parker. “I’m not used to that.”

Being hands-on helps Parker learn how to create beautiful smiles while she hopes to bring smiles to the community by setting an example.

“To help shift that dynamic and change the perspective and show that black people can do well, you can do anything that you want to do,” Parker said.

As Parker preps a crown, some might say she wears one herself as a catalyst for an inclusive community.

Marquette University School of Dentistry

“It made me feel like I had purpose in being here,” said Parker.

Parker will graduate in 2022. She hopes to open her own practice and offer free services to underprivileged communities.

This content was originally published here.

Hudson La Petite Dentistry surrenders license after investigation

HUDSON, Wis. — A former Hudson pediatric dentist was being investigated on accusations of unnecessarily pulling children’s teeth, billing fraud and overuse of laughing gas when he surrendered his license to practice last month.

Documents obtained through a public records request show Dr. Andy Mancini was being investigated in seven different cases by Wisconsin’s Department of Safety and Professional Services.

Andy Mancini
Andy Mancini

The alleged violations included engaging in practices that constitute a substantial danger to patients, according to records.

Cases investigated by the state agency resulted in criminal charges and a civil suit brought by the state for falsified Medicaid claims.

An attorney for Mancini, who lives in Woodbury, Minn., previously said he would not comment on legal matters involving his client. Mancini denied all allegations in a Wisconsin Dentistry Examining Board document outlining the permanent surrender of his license in Wisconsin.

Dozens of allegations

A 2016 memo from the state alleged 37 separate complaints, including multiple reports of unnecessary tooth extractions, billing problems, children being held down, “aggressive procedures” and a threat to a child.

Among the allegations outlined:

  • Patients were billed for treatments that weren’t performed.
  • A child was held down while “kicking, pinching and clawing to get out of the seat during an extraction procedure,” during an unnecessary extraction procedure that a parent was not allowed to sit in on.

A dentist from the Department of Human Services Office of the Inspector General conducted an audit — generated by patient complaints — that revealed:

  • Mancini used the sedative nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, at levels sometimes reaching a 70 percent concentration of nitrous oxide-to-oxygen, about double the recommended concentrations of 30-40 percent nitrous oxide for children.
  • Patient files included “grossly mislabeled” X-ray files. The audit noted that Mancini would take the same six X-rays each time he’d see a patient. Medicaid, the report notes, reimburses for up to six X-rays on any date of service.

In a November 2016 interview with investigators, Mancini denied performing unnecessary work, but admitted to the possibility of billing errors “due to the incompetence of previous staff.”

Mancini told investigators he allowed parents in the room while he’s performing exams, but discourages family from being present during procedures “because it can be distracting” and can lead to anxiety for patients.

Kirsten Reader, assistant deputy secretary of the Department of Safety and Professional Services, said Mancini voluntarily surrendered his license April 10. She said that happened during the investigations — the outcomes of which could have led to revocation of his license.

Parent complaints

The latest allegations didn’t surprise former La Petite client Rebecca Viebrock of Hudson

She said that after being initially impressed with La Petite’s kid-friendly atmosphere, she found herself having to return over and over.

“I practically lived at that place,” she said.

She grew skeptical, but she said her questions about X-rays and cavities were met with defensiveness from Mancini.

Viebrock said La Petite was one of the only dentists in the area that took state insurance. Without La Petite — where she also received dental care — Viebrock said she and her children are left without options in the area.

Stillwater resident Ashley Foley said she’s also in search of answers after learning about allegations of questionable care at La Petite. She said she took her children there for two years beginning in 2012 and never questioned the multiple tooth-pullings Mancini recommended.

Two of those involved her daughter’s front baby teeth, which have sat empty since the child was about 2. Foley said the girl is now 5 years old and must wait at least two more years before her adult teeth come in. Meanwhile, Foley said her daughter is in speech therapy and covers her mouth in shame when she smiles.

“What if this didn’t need to happen?” she said.

This content was originally published here.

The Real Truth About Dentistry – TeethRemoval.com

An intriguing long form piece appears in the May 2019 issue in Atlantic titled “The Truth About Dentistry: It’s much less scientific—and more prone to gratuitous procedures—than you may think,” written by Ferris Jabr, see https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/05/the-trouble-with-dentistry/586039/. This article has a lot of people talking including dentists, physicians, and patients who have experience with dentists throughout the Internet on forums and Twitter (see https://www.whitecoatinvestor.com/forums/topic/the-truth-about-dentistry-critical-longform-piece-in-the-atlantic/). The main shortcoming with this article in the Atlantic is it relies on an anecdotal story which forms the basis of the entire article. There are several themes to the article that will be discussed below along with additional themes not mentioned that are involved to form the real truth about dentistry.

1. Dentistry is a Business and some Dentists, just like in other Professions, are Bad Apples.

The article describes a dentist Lund who overtreats patients by performing more expensive procedures that are not necessary in order for him to make more money and does this for many many years. Dentist Lund’s way of making extra money is by having patients with cavities receive root canals with incision and drainage when cavities are the proper treatment.

I had a brother inlaw that was a dentist. I mention how the dentist is always trying to sell me on something. He said to me “We are a business too”. That was all I needed to know…..

— Patrick Husting (@patrickhusting)

“Years ago, at a routine dental cleaning, the wife was diagnosed with 18 asymptomatic ‘small cavities’  that needed to be fixed. So we got a 2nd opinion, lo and behold, no cavities. Somebody apparently needed a new boat.” – portlandia via whitecoatinvestor.com

2. There is a Unique Power Dynamic in Dentistry that is Unlike Other Relationships

Many aspects of the dental experience have resemblances to torture experiences. When a dentist is standing over a patient inserting sharp instruments into their mouth they often feel powerless. Perhaps because of this the vast majority of patients who see a dentist do not get a second opinion from another dentist. This is unlike medical doctor visits where seeing a second doctor for another opinion is more commonplace. Furthermore the vast majority of patients are not reading medical and dental literature on their own and discussing it with their dentists if there were any disagreements.

dentist mouth - The Real Truth About Dentistry
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3. Dentists Have very Little Checks and Balances on Their Practice

The article presents a story of a young dentist Zeidler who buys the practice of of retiring dentist Lund who had overtreated patients for years. After several months Zeidler suspects there is a problem because he was only making 10 to 25% of the prior dentist Lund’s reported income. Zeidler also encounters many of the patients of the practice and notices a large number of them have had more extensive treatment performed than needed. Zeidler spends nine month’s pooring over Lund’s patient records. The records demonstrate vast amounts of overtreatment. Thus the overtreatment by the dentist went unchecked for many many years and it was not until the dentist retired and the patients and records were seen by someone else that the overtreatment was detected. Most dentists have individual private practices which is unlike medical doctors who usually work for a hospital or organization with more oversight.

4. There is Little Scientific Evidence to Back Dental Treatments

The article discusses oral health studies performed by Cochrane which is a well respected evidence based medicine organization that conducts systematic reviews. Nearly all of the studies performed in the field of dentistry by Cochrane have shown either: 1) there is no evidence that the treatment works or 2) there is not enough evidence to say one way or the other that the treatment works. What to do in regards to dealing with healthy asymptotic wisdom teeth is one of these treatments in dentistry where there is a lack of scientific evidence to support either preventative removal or watchful waiting.

5. Dentists are Paid Based on Treatment and Not Prevention which is being made Worse Due to Large Student Loans

The reality is if everyone had healthy teeth and no need for dental treatment besides occasional cleanings, exams, and x-rays dentists would not make much money. The pay structure for dentists rewards procedures and treatments. Dentists today graduate from school with a large amount of debt and they also want to buy an individual practice to run. This can lead them in debt of well over $500,000 which can push them to recommend treatments and procedures that are not really needed to try to pay this debt off.

6. There is a Lack of Focus on Quality Improvement due to a Culture of Cover-Up

Everyone can agree that patients want high quality care at an affordable price. However dentists are hesitant to make real strides towards quality improvement due to fear of being sued and increased liability insurance premiums. Human error can never be completely eradicated and human nature is not perfect. Humans have varying anatomy that can’t always be anticipated. Thus protocols should be in place for dealing with things such as sexual assault in the dental office and to address what one should do when the wrong tooth is extracted. Similarly protocols should be in place to best identify what to look for on panoramic radiography to determine if a wisdom tooth is at high risk of damaging a nerve and if cone beam computed tomography or coronectomy should be performed. Similarly protocols should be in place when a sharp or needlestick injury occurs in the dental office. In addition protocols should be in place for when a dental instrument breaks and is left in a patient during a procedure. It seems that dentists could be sharing data with each other about what goes on in their practice and they could be addressing sensitive issues instead of pretending that they don’t and won’t again occur.

This content was originally published here.